ryan goldstein
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Ryan Goldstein


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ANTH 003 | Human Evolution

How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. First we cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution — the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and work with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts.
Completed: Fall 2008

BE 100   | Introduction to Bioengineering

Covers, at an introductory level, a variety of topics such as cellular and molecular therapies, novel medical devices to diagnose and treat disease, engineering and computational models of the body, genomics, biomechanics, cell signaling, and tissue engineering. Students will do hands-on experiments in the Bioengineering Undergraduate Lab, learn about statistics and experimental design, government regulations, and ethical and other professional considerations that affect bioengineering research and development. As an exercise, students will be asked to offer new bioengineering ideas and interventions, discuss and present them by applying the course and lab material.
Completed: Fall 2005
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BE 200   | Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Application of statics and dynamics to simple force analyses of the musculoskeletal system. Introduction to the fundamentals of strength of materials. Biomechanics of soft and hard tissues: microstructure and mechanical properties. This course is intended to provide a solid foundation in statics and mechanics of materials with particular focus on human joint biomechanics. The first portion of the course will present fundamental concepts of force and mechanics of rigid and deformable bodies. The remainder of the course will consist of an introduction of materials science and engineering, including the classification and bulk properties of implantable materials, and will also address specific topics including torsional loading and bending. By the end of the course, it is anticipated that students will be able to integrate the origin of tissue mechanical properties with structure/function analyses of load-bearing tissues in the human body.
Completed: Fall 2006
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BE 209   | Bioengineering Lab I

BE 209 is the first laboratory course in the bioengineering curriculum. It is required for both BSE and BAS majors.
Completed: Fall 2006
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BE 210   | Bioengineering Lab II

Second term of a two-year sequence designed to integrate real world experiences into various bioengineering science courses. Experiments and projects in mechanics, material and chemical applications to biomedical engineering.
Completed: Spring 2007
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BE 301   | Bioengineering Signals and Systems

Properties of signals and systems and examples of biological and biomedical signals and systems; linear, time invariant systems; Fourier analysis of signals and systems with applications to biomedical signals such as ECG and EEG; frequency analysis of first and second order systems; the frequency response of systems characterized by linear constant-coefficient differential equations; introduction to digital and analog filtering; sampling and sampling theorem and aliasing.
Completed: Fall 2007
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BE 303   | Ethics and Professional Responsibilities for Engineers

Provides an overview of the ethical and professional responsibilities of engineers as engineering professionals, as members of engineering organizations, and as participants in medical or scientific research. The course will make extensive use of student group presentations and role playing in the analysis of cases based on real-world problems with ethical dimensions. The case studies will vary from year to year, but will be chosen to reflect the full range of engineering fields and disciplines including areas of bioengineering and biomedical research.
Cross-listed: EAS 303
Completed: Fall 2007
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BE 305   | Engineering Principles of Human Physiology

Analysis of cellular and systems-level human physiology with an emphasis on clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on mechanisms of function in the neural and cardiovascular systems.
Completed: Fall 2007
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BE 310   | Bioengineering Lab IV

Fourth semester of a two year sequence designed to integrate real world experiences into various bioengineering and bioengineering science courses. Laboratory emphasizing biotransport and biomedical instrumentation.
Completed: Spring 2008
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BE 324   | Chemical Basis of Bioengineering

Advanced topics in physical chemistry including solution and colloid chemistry, electrochemistry, surface phenomena, and macromolecules applied to biological systems.
Completed: Fall 2008
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BE 350   | Transport Processes in Living Systems

Introduction to basic principles of fluid mechanics and of energy and mass transport with emphasis on applications to living systems and biomedical devices.
Completed: Spring 2008
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BE 400   | Clinical Preceptorship in Bioengineering

Introduction to the integration of biomedical engineering in clinical medicine through lectures and a preceptorship with clinical faculty. This course is for BE majors ONLY, with preference given to BSE students.
Completed: Spring 2008
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BE 421   | Brain-Computer Interfaces

This course will provide practical education in engineering technologies used to monitor and modulate the nervous system and their translation into clinical devices. Fundamental concepts in neurosignals, hardware, and software will be reinforced by practical examples and in-depth study of several neurodevice platforms over the course of the semester. Basic background in neurosignals will be provided, spanning scales from single neurons to large-scale field potentials, and across modalities from electrophysiology to optical and chemical recording. Algorithms for extracting, classifying, and modulating neurosignals will be covered, along with strategies for reducing them to practice on implantable computational platforms. Finally, some appreciation for hardware implemented in clinical systems will be given, along with their limitations and major design considerations. By the end of the course, students will be able to design and implement a scaled-down brain-computer interface device in computer software simulations, and understand basic concepts involved in its implementation and approval. The course is geared to advanced undergraduates and graduate students interested in understanding the basics of implantable neuro-devices, their design, practical implementation, approval, and use. Readings will cover the basics of neurosignal recording, analysis, algorithms for controlling therapy and fundamental concepts governing clinical implementation, approval, and use. The focus of the course will be on lectures and homework assignments that build incrementally towards culmination in a complete Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) design. Guest lecturers and demonstrations will supplement regular lectures.
Completed: Spring 2009
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BE 495   | Senior Design Project (first semester)

Design projects in various areas of bioengineering; projects are chosen by the students with approval of the instructor in the Spring semester of the Junior year; a proposal, three interim reports, a final report, and a presentation are required. Also emphasized are proposal and report writing, scheduling, project risk assessment, multidisciplinary environments, and ethics.
Completed: Fall 2008
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BE 496   | Senior Design Project (second semester)

Design projects in various areas of bioengineering; projects are chosen by the students with approval of the instructor in the Spring semester of the Junior year; a proposal, three interim reports, a final report, and a presentation are required. Also emphasized are proposal and report writing, scheduling, project risk assessment, multidisciplinary environments, and ethics.
Completed: Spring 2009
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BE 513   | Cell Biology

Introduction to cell and molecular biology with emphasis on quantitative concepts and applications to multicellular systems. (Graduate-level course — permission required for undergraduates.)
Completed: Fall 2008
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BE 520   | Computational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering

Computational modeling and simulation of the structure and function of brain circuits. A short survey of the major ideas and techniques in the neural network literature. Particular emphasis on models of hippocampus, basal ganglia, and visual cortex. A series of lab exercises introduces techniques of neural simulation. (Graduate-level course — permission required for undergraduates.)
Cross-listed: INSC 594
Completed: Spring 2008
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BIBB 240 | Human Chronobiology and Sleep

Topics to be covered include basic principles of chronobiology; neuroscience mechanisms of circadian rhythms and sleep; phylogeny and ontongeny of sleep; human sleep and sleep disorders; circadian dysfunction; circadian and sleep homeostatic influences in human health and safety.
Completed: Spring 2009
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BIOL 121 | Molecular Biology

An intensive introductory lecture and laboratory course covering the cell and molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry of bacteria, animals, and viruses. This course is comparable to Biology 101, but places greater emphasis on molecular mechanisms and experimental approaches. Particular attention will be devoted to the ways in which modern cell biological and molecular genetic methods contribute to our understanding of the evolution of life, the mechanisms underlying human disease, and applications in biotechnology.
Completed: Fall 2007

BIOL 202 | Cellular Biology and Biochemistry

An introduction to protein structure, enzyme kinetics, mechanism of enzyme action, and allosteric regulation of enzyme activity; introduction to cell structure and function including membrane structure, membrane receptors and signal transduction, motility, and the cell cycle.
Completed: Summer 2008

CHEM 053 | General Chemistry Laboratory I

A general laboratory course covering aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis, determination of chemical and physical properties, and chemical synthesis.
Completed: Fall 2005

CHEM 054 | General Chemistry Laboratory II

Continuation of CHEM 053.
Completed: Spring 2006

CHEM 101 | General Chemistry 101 for Engineers

Basic concepts and principles of chemistry and their applications in chemistry and closely-related fields. The first term emphasizes the understanding of chemical reactions through atomic and molecular structure. This is a university level course, treating the material in sufficient depth so that students can solve chemical problems and can understand the principles involved in their solution. It includes an introduction to condensed matter. This course is suitable for majors or non-majors and is recommended to satisfy either major or preprofessional requirements for general chemistry. This course is presented for students with high school chemistry and calculus. Students with a lesser background than this should take Chemistry 1.
Completed: Fall 2005

CHEM 102 | General Chemistry 102 for Engineers

Continuation of Chemistry 101. The second term stresses the thermodynamic approach to chemical reactions, electrochemical processes, and reaction rates and mechanisms. It includes special topics in chemistry.
Completed: Spring 2006

EAS 210  | Introduction to Nanotechnology

This introductory course presents both theoretical concepts and practical applications in the field of nanotechnology. A nanometer (nm) is one billionth of a meter. Nanostructures, objects on the length scale of 1 to 100 nm, often exhibit properties that are inconsistent with bulk properties. For example, bulk gold has a golden color, but gold nanoparticles with diameters ~15 nm are red, and ~40 nm gold nanoparticles are purple. The phenomenon of size effects is critical to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Characterization methods specific to the nanoscale are discussed, including scanning probe microscopies. The course describes both top-down and bottom-up fabrication methods for making nanostructures. Subsequently, the underlying nanoscale science is presented in connection with selected nanotechnologies, including smart materials, sensors, and molecular electronics.
Completed: Spring 2006

EAS 445  | Engineering Entrepreneurship I

Engineers and scientists create and lead great companies, hiring managers when and where needed to help execute their vision. Designed expressly for students having a keen interest in technological innovation, this course investigates the roles of inventors and founders in successful technology ventures. Through case studies and guest speakers, we introduce the knowledge and skills needed to recognize and seize a high-tech entrepreneurial opportunity — be it a product or service — and then successfully launch a startup or spin-off company. The course studies key areas of intellectual property, its protection and strategic value; opportunity analysis and concept testing; shaping technology-driven inventions into customer-driven products; constructing defensible competitive strategies; acquiring resources in the form of capital, people, and strategic partners; and the founder's leadership role in an emerging high-tech company. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on decisions faced by founders, and on the sequential risks and determinants of success in the early growth phase of a technology venture.
Completed: Summer 2008
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EAS 446  | Engineering Entrepreneurship II

This course is the sequel to EAS 445 and focuses on the planning process for a new technology venture. Like its prerequisite, the course is designed expressly for students of engineering and applied science having a keen interest in technological innovation. Whereas EAS 445 investigates the sequential stages of engineering entrepreneurship from the initial idea through the early growth phase of a startup company, EAS 446 provides hands-on experience in developing a business plan for such a venture. Working in teams, students prepare and present a comprehensive business plan for a high-tech opportunity. The course expands on topics from EAS 445 with more in-depth attention to: industry and marketplace analysis; competitive strategies related to high-tech product/service positioning, marketing, development and operations; and preparation of sound financial plans. Effective written and verbal presentation skills are emphasized throughout the course. Ultimately, each team presents its plan to a distinguished panel of recognized enterepreneurs, investors, and advisors from the high-tech industry.
Completed: Spring 2009
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EAS 448  | High-Tech Venture Development

This course will focus on important aspects of engineering entrepreneurship surrounding product development and marketing. Topics include new product development processes, methods of market analysis with emphasis on technology startups, targeting opportunities for new product development, and integrating marketing and product development strategies within the broader entrepreneurial process. The course will use case studies as well as in-depth analyses of several technology market segments.
Completed: Summer 2008
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ECON 001 | Microeconomics

Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly, and oligopoly; pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics.
Completed: Fall 2005
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ECON 002 | Macroeconomics

Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems.
Completed: Spring 2006
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ENGL 125 | Television Criticism

Focusing on a few genres — late night, prime time, and news — this course will introduce you to writing about the wonderful world of television, including critical reviews, entertainment stories, and academic scholarship. On the fun side, look for celebrity guests and a possible field trip to New York for a taping of Jon Stewart's "Daily Show" or other equally hip broadcast.
Completed: Spring 2008

LGST 206 | Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

From the department of Legal Studies and Business Ethics within the Wharton School, this course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.
Cross-listed: MGMT 291, OPIM 291
Completed: Spring 2009

MATH 104 | Calculus, Part I

Brief review of high school calculus, applications of integrals, transcendental functions, methods of integration, infinite series, Taylor's theorem. Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software in calculus.
Completed: Fall 2005
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MATH 114 | Calculus, Part II

Functions of several variables, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and applications, double and triple integrals, conic sections, polar coordinates, vectors and analytic geometry, first and second order ordinary differential equations. Applications to physical sciences. Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software in calculus.
Completed: Spring 2006
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MATH 240 | Calculus, Part III

Linear algebra: vectors, matrices, systems of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Vector calculus: functions of several variables, vector fields, line and surface integrals, Green's, Stokes', and divergence theorems. Series solutions of ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of ordinary differential equations. Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software.
Completed: Spring 2007
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MATH 241 | Calculus, Part IV

Sturm-Liouville problems, orthogonal functions, Fourier series, and partial differential equations including solutions of the wave, heat, and Laplace equations, Fourier transforms. Introduction to complex analysis. Use of symbolic manipulation and graphics software.
Completed: Summer 2008
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MEAM 415 | Product Design

This course provides tools and methods for creating new products. The course is intended for students with a strong career interest in new product development, entrepreneurship, and/or technology development. The course follows an overall product methodology, including the identification of customer needs, generation of product concepts, prototyping, and design-for-manufacturing. Weekly student assignments are focused on the design of a new product and culminate in the creation of a prototype. The course is open to juniors and seniors in SEAS or Wharton.
Cross-listed: OPIM 415
Completed: Spring 2009
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MSE 260  | Energetics of Macro/Nanoscale Materials

Basic principles of chemical thermodynamics as applied to macro and nano-sized materials. This course will cover the fundamentals of classical thermodynamics as applied to the calculation and prediction of phase stability, chemical reactivity, and synthesis of materials systems. The size-dependent properties of nano-sized systems will be explored through the incorporation of the thermodynamic properties of surfaces. The prediciton of the phase stability of two and three component systems will be illustrated through the calculation and interpretation of phase diagrams for metallic, semiconductor, inorganic, polymeric, and surfactant systems.
Completed: Spring 2007

MSE 465  | Fabrication/Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

This course surveys various processes that are used to produce materials structured at the micron and nanometer scales for electronic, optical, and chemical applications. Basic principles of chemistry, physics, thermodynamics, and kinetics are applied to solid state, liquid, and colloidal approaches to making materials. The newest approaches to nanofabrication: microcontact printing, self-assembly, and nanolithography, are covered. The course is heavily lab based, with 25% of class time and 30% of the homework devoted to hands on experiences. Lab assignments are a series of structured group projects. Evaluation is based on 3-4 lab reports, 4-5 problem sets, and 4-5 journal paper summaries.
Completed: Fall 2008

PHYS 140 | Principles of Physics I: Mechanics and Wave Motion

Recommended for science majors and engineering students. Classical laws of motions; interactions between particles; conservation laws and symmetry principles; particle and rigid body motion; gravitation; harmonic motion.
Completed: Fall 2005

PHYS 141 | Principles of Physics II: Electromagnetism and Radiation

Electric and magnetic fields; Coulomb's, Ampere's, and Faraday's laws; Maxwell's equations; emission, propagation, and absorption of electromagnetic radiation; interference, reflection, refraction, scattering, and diffraction phenomena.
Completed: Spring 2007

PHYS 280 | Physical Models of Biological Systems

Classic case studies of successful reductionistic models of complex phenomena, emphasizing the key steps of (1) making estimates, often based on dimensional analysis, (2) using them to figure out which physical variables and phenomena will be most relevant to a given system, and which may be disregarded, and (3) finding analogies to purely physical systems whose behavior is already known. The cases studied involve basic biological processes, mainly at the molecular and cellular level, in the light of ideas from physics. Topics may include entropic forces, free energy transduction at the molecular level, the structure of biopolymers, molecular motors, pattern formation (oscillation and morphogenesis), immune response, nerve impulses and neural computing, and other forms of signal transduction.
Cross-listed: BCHE 280
Completed: Fall 2008
Additional Information (Course Syllabus)


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